World Vision - What they do

World Vision

World Vision is a worldwide community development organisation that provides short-term and long-term assistance to 100 million people worldwide. For more than 50 years, World Vision has been engaging people to work towards eliminating poverty and its causes. World Vision works with people of all cultures, faiths and genders to achieve transformation the do this through relief and development, policy advocacy and change, collaboration, education about poverty, and emphasis on personal growth, social justice and spiritual values.

How we’ll make a difference

Meet those we support

TechnologyOne Foundation currently sponsors 16 youth predominantly from Myanmar. Our support has reached across the globe since 2007 to support those most in need.

Story

Aung

My name is Aung. I am a 16-year-old boy from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: helps family
  • My favourite game: playing group games
  • My grade level: doesn't currently attend school
  • My siblings: 1 brother and 1 sister

Myanmar

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

Chit

My name is Chit. I am a 14-year-old girl from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: helps family
  • My favourite game: playing group games
  • My grade level: 9
  • My favourite subject: Foreign language
  • My siblings: none

Myanmar

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

Thuzar

My name is Thuzar. I am a 11-year-old girl from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: helps family
  • My favourite game: playing with toys
  • My grade level: 5
  • My favourite subject: Local language
  • My siblings: none

Myanmar

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

Shahin

My name is Shahin. I am a 17-year-old girl from India.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: carries water
  • My favourite game: playing with dolls
  • My grade level: 11
  • My favourite subject: National language
  • My siblings: none

India

This is a fast growing urban area with a large number of slums. People come to live in these slums as they move to the city in search of work. They live in very poor conditions, characterised by a lack of drinking water and inadequate sanitation. Children are often sick from water-borne diseases or undernourished and underweight because of insufficient food. Many children are not educated and are forced to work at city rubbish dumps because of their family's poor economic situation. Child marriages are common and women's rights are often not respected.

Story

Hla

My name is Hla. I am a 13-year-old boy from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: runs errands
  • My favourite game: football
  • My grade level: 7
  • My favourite subject: Local language
  • My siblings: 4 brothers and 1 sister

Myanmar

This is a semi-rural area of southern Myanmar, about 40km from the capital. The area has a hot climate and about 47,000 people live here. Most people are farmers, but they lack the skills and tools to grow enough food so malnutrition is common. Lack of clean water and poor hygiene help to spread illnesses and there are no health centres nearby. Many parents cannot afford education and those children who do attend must travel far to reach school.

Story

Aye

My name is Aye. I am a 16-year-old girl from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: shops
  • My favourite game: drawing
  • My grade level: 8
  • My favourite subject: Mathematics
  • My siblings: 1 brother and 1 sister

Myanmar

This is a semi-rural area of southern Myanmar, about 40km from the capital. The area has a hot climate and about 47,000 people live here. Most people are farmers, but they lack the skills and tools to grow enough food so malnutrition is common. Lack of clean water and poor hygiene help to spread illnesses and there are no health centres nearby. Many parents cannot afford education and those children who do attend must travel far to reach school.

Story

Nay

My name is Nay. I am a 12-year-old boy from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: carries wood
  • My favourite game: football
  • My grade level: 5
  • My favourite subject: Mathematics
  • My siblings: 2 brothers and 3 sisters

Myanmar

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

Sekai

My name is Sekai. I am a 17-year-old girl from Zimbabwe.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: washes dishes
  • My favourite game: ball games
  • My grade level: 4
  • My favourite subject: Mathematics
  • My siblings: 5 sisters

Zimbabwe

High inflation, increasing poverty and high unemployment makes life very difficult for families here. Drought and poor harvests have continued for a number of years, leaving most households malnourished. Staple food crops such as maize are not growing well, and cotton crops fetch very low prices, leading to diminishing incomes. HIV and AIDS-related deaths are high, increasing the number of vulnerable and orphaned children and posing one of the biggest challenges for the community. Increasing numbers of households are adopting orphans but the elderly in particular are heavily burdened by the care and cost involved.

Story

Fabiola

My name is Fabiola. I am a 17-year-old girl from Rwanda.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: carries water
  • My favourite game: ball games
  • My grade level: 2
  • My favourite subject: Science
  • My siblings: 4 brothers

Rwanda

Very low literacy levels are the result of few, inaccessible schools. Classes are overcrowded and teachers are poorly trained. Hilly, infertile soils result in poor crops and a lack of food and money. Families can often afford only one meal per day. The single community health centre has no doctors on staff and just one bed. The centre treats many cases of malaria and malnutrition, and cares for community members living with HIV and AIDS. Many people continue to suffer debilitating physical and psychological effects of the past civil war.

Story

Nay

My name is Nay. I am a 14-year-old girl from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: carries wood
  • My favourite game: playing group games
  • My grade level: 8
  • My favourite subject: Science
  • My siblings: 1 brother

Myanmar

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

Sima

My name is Sima. I am a 4-year-old girl from Bangladesh.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: runs errans
  • My favourite game: running
  • My grade level: doesn't yet attend school
  • My siblings: none

Bangladesh

This is a densely populated area of the southern Bangladeshi city of Chittagong. The climate is hot and humid. Unemployment is high and many families struggle to earn enough income. Dirty water, poor sanitation and lack of hygiene knowledge lead to the spread of illnesses including diarrhoea and skin diseases. Poor diets also contribute to child malnutrition. Most children live far from the nearest school so they don’t attend or drop out early. They are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, including child labour and early marriage.

Story

Tin

My name is Tin. I am a 16-year-old boy from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: helps family
  • My favourite game: playing group games
  • My grade level: 10
  • My favourite subject: Social studies
  • My siblings: 3 brothers and 3 sisters

Myanmar

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

David

My name is David. I am a 11-year-old boy from Burundi.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: carries water
  • My favourite game: ball games
  • My grade level: 1
  • My favourite subject: Mathematics
  • My siblings: 2 brothers and 2 sisters

Burundi

This rural area 200km from the capital has a temperate climate and some 28,000 people live here. Most people are farmers, but erratic weather and environmental damage make it hard to grow enough food. Poor nutrition and hygiene and limited access to clean water leave children vulnerable to disease. HIV and AIDS is also a concern, but the health system is weak, with limited qualified staff and equipment. There aren't enough pre-schools and schools and many parents don't see education as important, so absenteeism and dropout rates are high.

Story

Sai

My name is Sai. I am a 14-year-old boy from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: runs errands
  • My favourite game: playing house
  • My grade level: 7
  • My favourite subject: Mathematics
  • My siblings: none

Myanmar

This is a semi-rural area of southern Myanmar, about 40km from the capital. The area has a hot climate and about 47,000 people live here. Most people are farmers, but they lack the skills and tools to grow enough food so malnutrition is common. Lack of clean water and poor hygiene help to spread illnesses and there are no health centres nearby. Many parents cannot afford education and those children who do attend must travel far to reach school.

Story

Aung

My name is Aung. I am a 12-year-old boy from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: helps family
  • My favourite game: football
  • My grade level: 6
  • My favourite subject: Local language
  • My siblings: 2 brothers

Myanma

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Story

May

My name is May. I am a 15-year-old girl from Myanmar.

My everyday life

  • My chores at home: runs errands
  • My favourite game: plauying with toys
  • My grade level: 10
  • My favourite subject: Local language
  • My siblings: 1 brother

Myanma

Families here rely on fishing as their main income source. Many struggle to earn a livelihood from their meagre catch. They also face problems such as child trafficking, child labour and HIV and AIDS. The majority of parents are simply too poor to send their children to school. Health is a key concern, with diseases such as respiratory infections, malaria and diarrhoea affecting many children. The number of orphans is also on the rise as a result of parents dying of AIDS-related diseases.

Plan International - What they do

Plan International

Plan International work alongside children, young people, supporters and partners to tackle root causes of the injustices facing girls and the most marginalised children. Programs include food, water, sanitation and hygiene, education and emergency services.

Every child has the right to a life free of poverty, discrimination and exploitation. The child sponsorships through Plan International support life-changing projects that are centred around children and their whole community so that all children in that community learn, decide, lead and thrive.

How we’ll make a difference

Story

Current Sponsored Child - Thing

  • Boy
  • Birthday 14 February 2005
  • Speaks local language
  • Religion: Buddhist
  • Lives: Cambodia
  • Education: Thing attends primary school. It takes less than 30 mins to reach school.
  • Health: According to the family, Thing has been healthy and not suffered from any serious illness. Thing has completed all basic vaccinations.
  • Family: Thing lives with his parents, Nag and Nam peasant farmers
  • Sister: Mao and Brother: Sin
  • Life in Ratanakiri: Thing’s family lives in a house made of wood with a metal roof and a wooden floor, the family uses wood for cooking, the family’s main source of water is a well, up to 5 mins away, Toilet: the family has no toilet facilities, the nearest health facility is about 30 mins away.

YKIP - What they do

YKIP

YKIP is a Foundation based in Bali, committed to improving the lives of those most in need, by breaking the cycle of poverty through educational support and services. Originally set up to assist in the recovery efforts after the Bali bombing in October 2002 and was expanded in 2004 to include health and education services.

In Bali today, approximately 127,000 students under 18 years old come from poor families and are 50% more likely to drop out of school. The primary reason for this drop out rate is economic hardship and as a result, this education disadvantage feeds the vicious cycle of poverty.

How we’ll make a difference

Through the support of the Foundation we support two Students - I Gege Oven Dwiantara and Iwayan Hadi Pratama. We have supported students since 2011. Our support helps our children by paying for uniforms, school supplies, course equipment and school fees.